Holistic Approach 💜

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SmoovieJavi

New member
Joined
Jul 31, 2019
Messages
4
Reason
DX FIBRO
Diagnosis
09/2009
Country
US
State
Pennsylvania
I am new to this forum thing so bare with me. I was wondering what kinds of Natural and Holistic options you may be using to help handle the day to day symptoms you have issues with. I was diagnosed about 10 years ago and I struggled so much! I could t keep up with the meds and didn’t like how many of them felt so I decided to try a more Holistic Approach, changing my eating habits, sleep habits, starting yoga etc. Have you tried anything Natural and/or plant based to help with your symptoms daily?
 

Leigh Blyth

Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2018
Messages
15
Reason
DX FIBRO
Diagnosis
01/1978
Country
UK
State
UK
The following is based on my recovery from over 40 years of pain, and nearly 20 years of depression:

I learned to use my body correctly by focusing on the 5 main muscles of movement. Starting from and always working from my Base-Line muscles.


1. pelvic floor "Base" (actually a group of muscles) - Think of these muscles contracting, a solid basket - the root/base of your body.

2. rectus abdominis Line. From pubic symphysis to your ribs at the front of your body, these parallel muscles are like to stacks of blocks to be activated in sequence extending from your pelvic floor Base. Our core pillar of strength that should support movement of the rest of the body.


Focus on your Base-Line becoming stronger and longer with every in breath.

Google images "Base-Line muscles" to see some pictures - a lot easier to understand than all my words!


It can take time to connect with muscles if you are not used to using them properly, but stick with it - think Base-Line all the time!


Then to connect your Base-Line to your legs by working with your gluteus maximus and rectus femoris muscles.


3. gluteus maximus . Your big ass muscles - think buns of steel. Solid, tight rocks....

4. rectus femoris . From pelvis to shin, a solid pole down the front of each thigh. The rectus femoris is part of the quads, but it is the only one that crosses both hip and knee joints so when it is fully active it aligns the hip and knee, positioning the leg as it should be.

Base-Line to upper body:


5. trapezius. The trapezius muscles are like a blanket of muscle from mid-back to the base of your skull, extending out shoulder to shoulder. Movement of the head and arms should start from the lower trapezius, expanding without restriction in all directions.


Have a look at the anatomy, find the 5 main muscles of movement on your body and then focus on them as you do whatever exercises feel comfortable to you.

All movement should start from and be supported by your Base-Line muscles, and is the key to starting to connect body and mind and feeling how to move to release some of the physical tensions on your body that restrict your movement and cause a lot of pain.

I started with Pilates. Yoga asanas now makes sense to me but my body was too wrecked - twisted, unbalanced and misaligned - for me to do any of the positions to start with. Tai chi is good for seeing how the body should be able to move.

I feel better than I ever have done before. I was a long process but the difference in my life is amazing!
 

Leigh Blyth

Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2018
Messages
15
Reason
DX FIBRO
Diagnosis
01/1978
Country
UK
State
UK
All movement should be supported by the Base-Line muscles.

Our core pillar of strength.

▹Breathe in and up through your nostrils.

▹Breathe out through your mouth.

▹Engage your Base-Line muscles as you inhale.

∗ Begin with your Base pelvic floor muscles.

  → Take as many breaths as you need to feel your pelvic floor muscles engaging.

The solid base from where all movement should stem.

∗ Then focus on your mid-Line muscles.

  → As you breathe in and up through your nostrils, focus on each section of the rectus abdominis muscles activating and extending in sequence, from your pelvis to your chest.

Like a stack of panels to be switched on, your central pillar of strength.

Think: Longer and stronger with every breath in.

Take as many breaths as you need to engage and elongate your Base-Line.

I found it easiest to work on my breathing whilst standing (in a relaxed manner) or lying on my back.  Do whatever feels good for you.

It can take a long time to break old habits and many breaths to activate the correct muscles if you are not used to using them but keep thinking about them and start to feel these muscles.

The main movement during my recovery was the roll-down.

I found myself using the roll-down action again and again.

It felt good.

The standing roll-down is the best way to start, giving the greatest degree of freedom to move with your Base-Line (unless this movement is contraindicated by other issues)

How to Roll-Down:

Stand in a comfortable position.   Don't worry about where your feet are to start - remember you are working from your Base-Line outwards.

Take as many breaths as you need to activate and lengthen your Base-Line from pelvis to chest, breathing in and up through your nostrils.   Adjust your stance and move as feels natural.

Exhale through your mouth and begin to roll-down from 'top to bottom', lowering your head towards your feet whilst feeling the support coming from your Base-Line.

Roll-down as far as comfortable.   Pause and re-activate your Base-Line over a few breaths, relaxing the rest of your body as much as you can.

Breathe.

Move your body as it feels right to do so-

Gently swing your arms, stretch and wiggle your fingers.   Move your legs, bend your knees, flex your ankles and toes.   Shift your weight on your feet - heel to toe, side to side.   Open and close your mouth, move your jaw, roll your eyes, pull faces, stick your tongue out.   Whatever feels good!   The possibilities are endless.

Let the tension go.

You may start to experience 'releases' allowing you to melt down a little further.   These feel good.   There may be cracks/pops and other sounds and sensations.   Relax, keep breathing and focus on your Base-Line.

There's no rush. Never force anything.

Stand up when you are ready, however feels comfortable. (Rolling up is good - only when you can do it!)

Move around.   Feel for the relative positions of your main muscles of movement.   Aim for a balance between left and right sides.

Repeat the roll-down.   Where and whenever you can.

Enjoy it.   Gain a little more freedom each time.

It takes practice and concentration to engage the right muscles if you are not used to using them.   Long-standing bad habits take time to rectify so you must keep working at it.

You may not be able to move very far at first and are likely to encounter areas of tension.   You may start to notice how your body adjusts itself to avoid certain positions as you roll-down.

Do what you can and every day you'll be able to do a little more.

Use the roll-down action in other positions when you feel ready - sitting, kneeling, whatever feels right.
 
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