Interesting article: Autoimmunity and Neuroinflammation in Fibromyalgia

Jemima

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There's an interesting new article about fibromyalgia on the Very Well Health website, titled Autoimmunity and Neuroinflammation in Fibromyalgia. It explores the recent research indicating FM as autoimmune, and draws that together with some of the other developments in fibromyalgia research in a way that I haven't encountered elsewhere. Have a Google if so inclined - I'd say it's worth a read for those of you who like diving into the details!
 

BombayMum

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Yes, FM is an auto immune disorder. I can confirm as was told so 5 years back by one orthopaedic who suspected some form of autoimmune disease and atleast 2 rheumat specialist doctors, one of whom diagnosed me with FM and the second one was looking into the similar line of other autoimmune diseases such as SLE. All treatment I received was line of treatment for auto-immune disease.
 

sunkacola

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Yes, FM is an auto immune disorder. I can confirm as was told so 5 years back by one orthopaedic who suspected some form of autoimmune disease and atleast 2 rheumat specialist doctors, one of whom diagnosed me with FM and the second one was looking into the similar line of other autoimmune diseases such as SLE. All treatment I received was line of treatment for auto-immune disease.
There has not yet been any conclusive or scientific proof that Fibromyalgia is an auto immune disorder. This is a fact.

Two or three doctors telling you that doesn't make it true. Doctors do not always know what they are talking about when it comes to fibromyalgia, and hand out bad advice, do tests that are no longer used because they are worthless for diagnosing, and make all kinds of claims, for instance saying it is actually a psychiatric disorder. In fact, I bet you could find a doctor who would say that it is any number of things. But that doesn't make it true.

We are all taught to believe what our doctors say, but experience of those who have dealt with a chronic condition that is very poorly understood shows us that, while doctors are very good at some things, they do not know everything. So far, NO one knows for sure how to classify fibromyalgia, and no one has proven that is is this or that thing. This is probably because fibromyalgia is an umbrella diagnosis, covering probably over a hundred different symptoms seen in various combinations in different people, and yet no one specific cause they know how to test for is shown to be the cause.

The article that Jemima refers to suggests that it might be an auto immune disorder. But this has not yet been proven and the article doesn't claim it is. Until it is proven with serious and meticulous medical and scientific studies, and published in a peer-reviewed substantial scientific publication, it is not proven. And so far that hasn't happened. I think it is important to remember this.
 

JayCS

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Yes, FM is an auto immune disorder. I can confirm as was told so 5 years back by one orthopaedic who suspected some form of autoimmune disease and atleast 2 rheumat specialist doctors, one of whom diagnosed me with FM and the second one was looking into the similar line of other autoimmune diseases such as SLE. All treatment I received was line of treatment for auto-immune disease.
Hi BombayMum, thanks a lot 👐 for pointing me to this old post of @Jemima's that seems to have slipped past me, it does actually have a few interesting details, altho as @sunkacola's said - there is no proof of FM being autoimmune, the studies only show hunches resulting in some pointers and any docs saying this are using a crystal ball.

But the article has pointed me to small details I'd never been able to take in before, like this one which I even thought was wrong:
Low serotonin might be caused by autoantibodies to serotonin, which can be called "Antiserotonin (antibody)". (GABA increases serotonin & helps me, so my serotonin is low (common in fibromyalgia).)
However even this were proven, it wouldn't be on a level of causes of fibromyalgia, but only of biomarkers (association isn't causation) - and nowhere near solid treatments.

Now again, the evidence for the antiserotonin-connection isn't particularly high and also very old (1992 & 1995 by one group, 2001 by another). For instance an article from 2008 summing this up, authored amongst others by "one of our experts" Daniel Clauw, said it's praps even less clear than the tender points, which they at that time were still defending a bit. They reviewed evidence for 15 sets of biomarkers and came to the conclusion: "Of the objective tests, those that hold the most promise as biomarkers are probably tests that directly assess elements of neural function, such as functional neuroimaging, ERPs, and DNIC."
"Antiserotonin antibody noted to be increased in three cross-sectional studies by two different groups.
Stringent controls necessary prior to determining utility. Longitudinal studies needed."
Not sure if that's interesting for @miamisunset - it says "Autonomic reactivity: Lower heart rate variability noted in three cross-sectional studies by two different groups. May predispose to condition. Longitudinal studies needed"
That study is called "Biology and therapy of fibromyalgia. Evidence-based biomarkers for fibromyalgia syndrome" (2008).

The second highest autoantibodies ("71%") next to the ones for serotonin ("73%") are gangliosides: "Gangliosides may be an important aspect of FM autoimmunity. They’re believed to be involved in small-fiber neuropathy."

A more recent article (2019) quoting this and quoted by verywellhealth is: Neuroimmunology: What Role for Autoimmunity, Neuroinflammation, and Small Fiber Neuropathy in Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Adverse Events after Human Papillomavirus Vaccination?

What confuses any clear conclusions for me is that antiserotonin antibodies might reduce the serotonin released by mast cells, or more generally serotonin can be high in mast cell disorders, of which I have MCAS.
 
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